Former policewoman who stalked married man is jailed for 11 months

“It has been an absolute nightmare…”

Former policewoman who stalked married man is jailed for 11 months

A former policewoman will spend the next 11 months in prison for her decision to harass and stalk a married man online.

On 6 October, Glasgow Sheriff Court handed down the prison sentence along with a five-year non-harassment order to Ashley Boyd, 26. The punishment comes in light of Boyd's apparent fixation on a former colleague named Kevin O'Connor that spiraled out of control.

The trouble first started between Boyd and O'Connor in 2013 when they used to work together as fellow police officers. As reported by Daily Mail, Boyd told O'Connor that she knew a number of women "fancied him" in January 2014.

She also told a friend that she had a thing for him and routinely went to the gym because she knew he would be there. None of this went over well with O'Connor, who stopped working with Boyd in March 2015 when the policewoman left for Police Scotland.

2016 marked an escalation in Boyd's fixation. While on vacation with his wife, O'Connor learned from his sister that someone had changed his Facebook relationship status to "single." A colleague also texted him to say they had had a strange conversation with O'Connor over Facebook about some fabricated marriage strife.

It didn't take long for O'Connor to figure out that Boyd was behind the strange activity. Unfortunately, he couldn't do much about it. Procurator fiscal depute Andrew Beadsworth said as much to The Sun:

"Mr O’Connor was concerned and angry. Efforts made by him to delete the Facebook account were unsuccessful because Boyd had changed the password and linked email address to the account."

In the meantime, Boyd seized control of O'Connor's Twitter profile and sent out offensive tweets about his wife. She even phoned the Glasgow Royal Infirmary hospital twice on one day in September 2016 to cancel an appointment for Mrs. O'Connor.

To cover her tracks, Boyd took a friend to the police station so that they could confess to the malicious activity. But that friend eventually gave Boyd up.

Needless to say, there are plenty of people out there who for some reason or another get it in their heads to stalk another person online. You can't control the actions of these individuals. All you can do is be upfront with your expectations of them and report any suspicious behavior to the authorities.

You should also do everything you can to protect your digital identity online by using complex passwords, enabling two-step verification (2SV) when it's available, and setting less-than-obvious answers for your security questions.

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One Response

  1. Mike

    October 13, 2017 at 12:24 pm #

    It's nut jobs like this that make me want a flight to Mars. Sounds just like my ex. When I moved to a new place she kindly gave me a weird pink blind for the window, that in actual fact, just communicated with my new neighbours that I was gay (pink triangle) – Took me a while to figure out I had been duped by her.

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