Privacy

Google’s ad ban won’t stop stalkerware apps from promoting themselves

Google has announced that from August 2020 it will be prohibiting ads for stalkerware products and services.

But a loophole means that the companies behind creepy stalkerware apps will still be able to advertise themselves.

Smashing Security podcast #186: This one’s for all the Karens!

A high-rolling Hushpuppi gets extradited to the United States, Carole details her problems with clipboards and Disposophobia, and our guest becomes the subject of fake news during the Senegalese election.

All this and much much more is discussed in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast with Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by investigative journalist Michelle Madsen.

bitdefender.com

Ex-Yahoo employee avoids jail, despite hacking 6000 accounts, and stealing nude photos and videos

A former employee of Yahoo has been sentenced and ordered to pay a fine after exploiting his privileged access to hack into the personal accounts of thousands of Yahoo users, in his hunt for naked photographs and videos of young women.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Smashing Security podcast #184: Vanity Bitcoin wallets, BlueLeaks, and a Coronavirus app conspiracy

A conspiracy spreads on social media about Coronavirus tracing apps, US police find decades’ worth of sensitive data leaked online, and is there a Bitcoin bonanza to be had from watching Elon Musk YouTube videos?

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by the BBC’s Zoe Kleinman.

HEY pulls feature which could expose email threads without participants’ knowledge

HEY, a new service which aims to revolutionise users’ inboxes, admits it made a mistake which could have made it too easy for private messages to be exposed.

Pubs and restaurants left guessing after being told to collect customer data as lockdown eases

In just ten days, the UK Government says English pubs, restaurants, and cafes can open again for business.

However, they are told that they should collect contact information about every customer and visitor to their premises. But what they’re not told is how they should do this in a way that protects people’s security and privacy.

Smashing Security podcast #183: MAMILs, gameshows, and a surprise from eBay

A TV gameshow with cash prizes if you’re obeying Coronavirus lockdown rules, ex-Ebay staff charged in crazy cyberstalking case, and when the wrong cyclist was accused by the internet bearing pitchforks.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Maria Varmazis.

NHS Test & Trace sends text to wrong person, telling them they tested negative for Coronavirus

A former MP warns that she received a message intended for someone else, with the results of their Coronavirus test.

Suspicious wife fails to get good password advice from The Guardian

The Guardian offers relationship advice over an unwise password choice, but fails to give any good password advice.

tripwire.com

Babylon Health app leaked patients’ video consultations

Babylon Health, makers of a smartphone app that allows Brits to have consultations with NHS doctors, has admitted that a “software error” resulted in some users being able to access other patients’ private video chats with GPs.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Nintendo warns 300,000 accounts have been hacked since early April

Video gaming firm Nintendo has warned customers to not reuse passwords on different services after releasing an increased tally of compromised accounts since April.

Smashing Security podcast #181: Anti-cybercrime ads, tricky tracing, and a 5G Bioshield

Police are hoping to stop kids becoming cybercriminals by bombarding them with Google Ads, phishers rub their hands in glee at the NHS track and trace service, and just how does a nano-layer of quantum holographic catalyzer technology make a USB stick cost hundreds of pounds?

All this and much much more is discussed in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast.

What the NHS Test and Trace scheme could learn from banks about stopping scams

I’m concerned that fraudsters will disguise themselves as the NHS Test and Trace Service, and trick people into giving over sensitive personal information – and maybe even some money.

Maybe something could be learnt from the banks?

Smashing Security podcast #180: Taking care of Clare

On this special splinter episode of the podcast, we’re joined by actor and comedian Clare Blackwood in the hope of convincing her that cybersecurity is no laughing matter.

Hear what happens in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault.

Smashing Security podcast #179: Deepfake Jay-Z, and beer apps spilling your data

Apps that belch out sensitive military information, what could the world learn from South Korea’s digital response to the Coronavirus pandemic, and who has been deepfaking Bill Clinton, Jay-Z, and Donald Trump… and why?

All this and much much more is discussed in the latest episode by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Brian Klaas of the “Power Corrupts” podcast.

bitdefender.com

Edison Mail bug exposed iPhone users’ email accounts to complete strangers

The makers of a popular iOS email app have warned their users that their accounts may have been compromised after a buggy software update made it possible to see strangers’ emails.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.