Privacy

WeTransfer security failure results in file transfer emails being sent to the wrong people

WeTransfer, the popular online service for sharing large files easily without having to worry about gobbling up email inbox quotas, has suffered what the company is calling a “security incident.”


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Smashing Security #133: Cookie cock-ups, Hong Kong protests, and smart TV virus scans

We head to Hong Kong to look at how technology has helped anti-government protesters (and how China has tried to disrupt it), Samsung is skittish over whether to tell TV owners to virus-scan their devices, and you won’t believe whose website is not GDPR-compliant.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by James Thomson.


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NHS service accidentally reveals identities of HIV patients in email blunder

An NHS health board has found itself in the awkward position of apologising to 37 HIV patients, after accidentally disclosing their identities.


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Bella Thorne releases her own topless photos after hacker threats

Actress refuses to play into hacker’s hands, and publishes topless images of herself.


2 min read

Smashing Security #132: CBP cyber attack, an iPhone privacy boost, and Twitter list abuse

United States Customs and Border Protection had sensitive data stolen, but the hackers didn’t have to breach its network. Apple has ambitious plans to make iPhone users safer online. And trolls are using Twitter lists to target their victims.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Maria Varmazis.


1 min read

bitdefender.com

La Liga fined €250,000 after Android app spied on football fans

The Spanish football league La Liga has been hit with a fine after its official Android app was found sneakily listening to people’s surroundings when soccer matches were being played.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.


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Umm.. that’s not a movies password update. That’s a downgrade

A cinema chain has given customers a password that any mischief-maker with half a brain cell could deduce.


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Smashing Security #131: Zap yourself from the net, and patch now against BlueKeep

Microsoft issues warning to unpatched Windows users about worm risk, and how do you delete all traces of yourself off the internet after you murder your podcast co-host?

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault.


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Facebook lawyer argues you should have ‘no expectation of privacy’

Next time someone connected to Facebook tries to convince you that it’s now really serious about privacy you know they’re pulling your leg.


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Data protection authority reports itself to itself after data breach

The Dutch Data Protection Authority has confessed to making the same kind of mistake that many others have made before – sending out an email with a long list of email addresses listed for all to see in the Cc: rather than hidden away via the Bcc: field.


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London Underground passengers told to turn off their Wi-Fi if they don’t want to be tracked

From 8 July 2019, travellers on London’s underground tube network may wish to turn off their Wi-Fi first… if they don’t like the idea of being tracked.


1 min read

bitdefender.com

Snapchat workers snooped on users with internal tool

Snapchat’s 186 million users may be in for a rude awakening today after revelation that multiple employees of the social media giant were able to abuse their power and snoop on members.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.


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Fingerprinting iPhones with the built-in gyroscope

Some rather ingenious researchers have found a way to unique identify iPhones and iPads by examining data gathered from a device’s accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer sensors.


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bitdefender.com

Google stored business customers’ passwords in plaintext on its servers… for 14 years

Google has admitted that some of its business customers of G Suite (formerly known as Google Apps) had their passwords stored on the company’s internal servers for 14 years in plaintext.

Read more in my article on the Bitdefender Business Insights blog.


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tripwire.com

Data on millions of Instagram accounts spills onto the internet

A security researcher has discovered a publicly-accessible database containing the details of millions of Instagram users, including their contact information.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.


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Smashing Security #128: Shackled ankles, photo scrapes, and SIM card swaps

A bad software update causes big headaches for Dutch police, but brings temporary freedom to criminals. SIM swaps are in the news again as fraudsters steal millions. And does your cloud photo storage service have a dirty little secret?

All this and much much more is discussed in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Rip Off Britain’s David McClelland.


1 min read