facial recognition

Smashing Security podcast #168: The Bitcoin fraud factory

Fraudsters steal millions from those hoping to jump on the Bitcoin bandwagon, Twitter verifies a fake US politician, and it’s another face palm for facial recognition.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by The Cyberwire’s Dave Bittner.

Want your photo removed from our facial recognition database? Just send us your photo and government-issued ID…

Controversial firm Clearview AI which stole your photographs from social media sites to feed their facial recognition database expects you to send them your photos and a scan of your ID if you want to have your data removed.

Uhh, yeah. Right.

Smashing Security podcast #162: Robocalls, health hacks, and facial recognition fears

A hospital gets hacked because of an ex-employee’s grudge, robocalls are on the rise, and we share a scary story about the future of facial recognition.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Michael Hucks.

Smashing Security podcast #128: Shackled ankles, photo scrapes, and SIM card swaps

A bad software update causes big headaches for Dutch police, but brings temporary freedom to criminals. SIM swaps are in the news again as fraudsters steal millions. And does your cloud photo storage service have a dirty little secret?

All this and much much more is discussed in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Rip Off Britain’s David McClelland.

Ever app users uploaded billions of photos, unaware they were being used to build a facial recognition system

Users have shared the private photos stored in their email and social networks with Ever – not realising that they were being used to feed a facial recognition system.

Smashing Security podcast #125: Pick of the thief!

WannaCry’s “accidental hero” pleads guilty to malware charges, Samsung and Nokia have fingerprint fumbles, the NCSC publishes a list of 100,000 dreadful passwords, and Apple finds itself at the centre of an identity mix-up.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by John Hawes.

Facial recognition fail allows politician’s kids to access his laptop

MEP Matt Carthy wondered why the battery life on his laptop was running down so quickly…

Smashing Security podcast #122: The big fat con at Office Depot

Office Depot and OfficeMax are fined millions for tricking customers into thinking their computers were infected with malware, car alarms can make your vehicle less secure, and facial recognition in apartment blocks comes under the microscope.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by The Cyberwire’s Dave Bittner.

tripwire.com

Unlocking Android phones with a 3D-printed head

Forbes journalist Thomas Brewster wanted to find out just how well a variety of Android phones and a top-of-the-range Apple iPhone would fare against a determined attempt to break facial recognition. And he did that by having a 3D-model printed of his head.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Smashing Security podcast #087: How Russia hacked the US election

Regardless of whether Donald Trump believes Russia hacked the Democrats in the run-up to the US Presidential election or not, we explain how they did it. And Carole explores some of the creepier things being done in the name of surveillance.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault.

Smashing Security podcast #078: Hounds hunt hackers, too-human Google AI, and ethnic recognition tech – WTF?

Dogs are trained to sniff out hackers’ hard drives, facial recognition takes an ugly turn, and do you trust Google to book your hair appointment?

All this and more is discussed in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by investigative journalist Geoff White.

Facebook pushes ahead with controversial facial recognition feature in Europe

Facebook has started pushing European and Canadian users into giving its controversial facial recognition technology free reign to run rampant over their photos and videos.

bitdefender.com

Fooling Windows 10 facial authentication with a photo

Unlocking your computer with a smile might save you four seconds, but you might be in danger of losing a lot more by relying solely on your face for security.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Smashing Security podcast #041: Hacking Instagram, facial failures, and spying bosses

It’s easy to phone up a celebrity on Instagram following security breach, facial recognition at Notting Hill Carnival can’t tell the girls from the boys, and companies are spying on their workers’ activities.

All this and more is discussed in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by special guest David Bisson.

tripwire.com

Are you looking at me? Welcome to the world of facial recognition

As new technologies develop, it’s worth reminding ourselves that just because we can do something doesn’t mean that we should. Often a new technology can bring plenty of new opportunities to do amazing things, but that doesn’t mean that it cannot also be ripe for abuse.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

UK cops arrest man picked out by automatic facial recognition software

In our pursuit of greater security, we must not throw away our fundamental human rights for privacy.