Malware

GermanWiper isn’t ransomware. It’s worse than that

The tech press is full of stories about “a new ransomware strain” called GermanWiper, that has hit German businesses hard in the last week.

But the reality is that GermanWiper is much worse than ransomware.


1 min read

Smashing Security #139: Capital One hacked, iMessage flaws, and anonymity my ass!

Capital One gets hacked, critical vulnerabilities are found in iMessage, and data anonymization may not be as good as we hope. But listen up, we also discuss the Legend of Zelda, a biography of tech giants, offer advice for escaping an angry moose, and are introduced to… Penelope?

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast.


2 min read

Google found a way to remotely attack Apple iOS devices by sending a boobytrapped iMessage

Have you updated your iPhone and iPad to iOS 12.4 yet?

If you care about your security and privacy, then Google researchers have given you a very good incentive to do so as soon as possible.


1 min read

bitdefender.com

IoT botnet launched massive 13-day DDoS attack against streaming service

Can you put your hand on your heart and say the web application your company has built would be able to handle 292,000 requests per second, from 402,000 different IP addresses?

Read more in my article on the Bitdefender BOX blog.


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Louisiana declares state of emergency after ransomware attacks

Don’t wait until ransomware strikes and then push the button marked “emergency response.” Make sure you take preventative measures in advance, such as making secure offsite backups of anything you cannot afford to lose.


1 min read

Smashing Security #138: Logic bombs, brain data exploitation, and Digga D tweets

Logic bombs in Excel spreadsheets, how should we protect our brain data from big companies, and how did bizarre messages about Drill rap end up on the Metropolitan Police’s Twitter account and website?

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by BJ Mendelson.


1 min read

tripwire.com

Thousands of NHS computers are still running Windows XP from beyond the grave

Two years after the WannaCry ransomware outbreak shone a light on the computer security of the the UK’s National Health Service, and five years after Microsoft said it would no longer release patches for Windows XP, the NHS still has 2,300 PCs running the outdated operating system.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.


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Smashing Security #137: Porn trolling lawyers, Insta hacking, and Ctrl-Alt-LED

Erection your honour! Lawyers find themselves behind bars after they make porn movies in an attempt to scam internet users, boffins in Israel detail a way to steal data from an air-gapped computer, and Instagram coughs up $30,000 after a researcher finds a simple way to hack into anybody’s account.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast.


1 min read

Smashing Security #136: Oops, we created Iran’s hacking exploit

Mac users of the Zoom video conferencing app are warned their webcams could be hijacked, security firms warn of how scammers are deepfaking audio to steal from businesses, and our guest owns up to the role he played in an Iranian cyberattack against US organisations.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Charl van der Walt.


1 min read

tripwire.com

British Airways faces record £183 million GDPR fine after data breach

British Airways is facing a record fine of £183 million, after its systems were breached by hackers last year and the personal and payment card information of around 500,000 customers were stolen.

Read more about what you need to know in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.


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St John Ambulance service hit by ransomware attack

The UK’s St John Ambulance service says that it was hit by a ransomware attack earlier this week, but if the attackers hoped they might massively disrupt the volunteer first aid service then they’ll be massively disappointed.


1 min read

Smashing Security #135: Zombie grannies and unintended leaks

We take a bloodied baseball bat to Android malware, and debate the merits of a social media strike, as one of the team bites the bullet and buys a smart lock for the office.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Oli Skertchly.


1 min read

bitdefender.com

US Cyber Command warns nation-state hackers are exploiting old Microsoft Outlook bug. Make sure you’re patched!

US Cyber Command has issued an alert about an unnamed foreign country’s attempt to spread malware through the exploitation of a vulnerability in Microsoft Outlook, as concerns are raised of a rise in an Iranian-backed hacking group’s activities.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.


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Malware makes an exhibition of itself

If you happen to be in the Netherlands in the next few months you may be interested in dropping into an unusual art exhibition.

From Friday 5 July until 10 November, you’ll be able to check out “Malware: Symptoms of Viral Infection” at the Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam.


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tripwire.com

$1.1 million in two weeks – Florida cities pay out big to ransomware gangs

Cybercriminals have learnt something very valuable in the last couple of weeks: in order to regain access to their data, cities in Florida are prepared to pay out huge Bitcoin ransoms to hackers.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.


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bitdefender.com

Millions of Dell PCs vulnerable to attack, due to a flaw in bundled system-health software

Millions of Dell PCs and laptops running Windows are vulnerable to attack via a high severity security hole, that could be exploited by malicious hackers to seize control of devices.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.


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