Adobe cockup means you may have two different versions of Flash installed on your PC

Graham Cluley

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Shaun Nichols writing for The Register:

Adobe says a buggy installer is the reason some people have two different versions of Flash Player on their Windows PCs.

The software house told The Register it had to create an additional build of the browser plugin specifically for Microsoft’s Internet Explorer after the version made for other browsers – such as Mozilla’s Firefox and Microsoft’s Edge – wouldn’t install properly for IE.

So, for example, if you have Internet Explorer and Firefox on your machine, you’ll have two slightly different copies of Flash that should be functionally the same.

Quality control? Testing? What’s that then?

I wouldn’t blame you if you feel that this is the straw that broke the camel’s back. Here is how to completely uninstall Adobe Flash from your computer.

Graham Cluley Graham Cluley is a veteran of the anti-virus industry having worked for a number of security companies since the early 1990s when he wrote the first ever version of Dr Solomon's Anti-Virus Toolkit for Windows. Now an independent security analyst, he regularly makes media appearances and is an international public speaker on the topic of computer security, hackers, and online privacy. Follow him on Twitter at @gcluley, or drop him an email.

6 Replies to “Adobe cockup means you may have two different versions of Flash installed on your PC”

  1. Thanks for the tip on updating or removing Adobe Flash. I'd been following your advice as my main browser is Google Chrome and it's on the latest version already.

    What is annoying me though, is that Microsoft Edge has Flash, but there's no way to remove that browser from the system. It's akin to crapware / bloatware, anyway Graham, thanks once again.

    1. You don't need to uninstall Microsoft Edge. Like Google Chrome the Flash engine is updated automatically (via Windows Updates).

      However if you really, really want to permanently remove Edge (and I don't recommend it) then follow the instructions below:

      http://winaero.com/blog/how-to-uninstall-and-remove-edge-browser-in-windows-10/

      It's probably a better idea for you to set Google Chrome as your default browser instead of uninstalling Edge. The instructions for setting a default browser are below:

      http://home.bt.com/tech-gadgets/computing/how-to-change-your-default-web-browser-in-windows-10-11364000481508

  2. We'd love to take Flash off our computers. Unfortunately, the state of Virginia requires you have to Flash installed in order to pay sales and other taxes online. And companies are required to pay online now. We can't pay by check in the mail any more. So we're between a rock and a hard place with Flash.

  3. Sadly this guy doesn't know what he's talking about. There's always been 3 versions of Flash.

    1) the ActiveX version for IE
    2) the NPAPI version for Firefox
    3) the PPAPI version for Chrome

    You have to update all 3 separately. or yes, you'll end up with different versions.

    It's always been this way, for going on 8+ years now. It's not some new bug. It's by design.

    Talk about 'Flash hate'.

    1. Adobe staff have confirmed the bug, and say it is fixed in version 22.0.0.210.

      https://forums.adobe.com/message/8877241#8877241

    2. Besides what Graham already referred you to, I want to point something out. Let's say it truly was a design (flaw!) and not a bug. You know what else it would still be? Software with a horrible reputation when it comes to security. Anyone who says this is then 'Flash hate' is either a sympathiser when it comes to the flaws (which might mean abusing them) or is incredibly ignorant/naive when it comes to the risks.

      Oh, and yes. There is another thing it would be: worthy example of how NOT to design software. Actually, forget the suggestion it currently isn't; Flash IS terribly designed. And no sane administrator (and yes I fully realise there might be some irony in such words but that is immaterial) would have three different versions of the same software on the same production (not for development) computer. That is completely stupid and asking for trouble.

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